I am currently a student attending a city university member college. I am also taking courses at an Atelier while exploring employment opportunities in writing and editing. No idea why I came here, but I'll hopefully figure that all out soon.

 

color-palettes:

Shout out to this incredible color resource site! They give you anything and everything you could ever want to know about a color from color schemes to RGB percentage makeup. There’s even a color blindness simulator for help with using visible/accessible colors for all viewers.

So keep this site in mind if you’re a graphic designer, interior designer, artist, color enthusiast, or whatever! It’s quite awesome.

littleulvar:

when it comes to specific poses I try to first draw the most basic shapes and movement lines and then gradually go into more and more details, like so:

image

image

if you have difficulties with perspective, try drawing a perspective grid first:

image

it’s nothing different than tips from other artists, but I hope it helped a little ;u;

elliotoille:

felt like doing a tutorial thingy (what should I call these??) again! I think I’ll make a tag for these in case I do more. This time I’m gonna talk a little about how angles affect how clothing falls aaaand stuff. here we go…
Given: The first drawing of these three is how the clothing naturally wants to fall, how it is made to be shaped. Or, whichever pose you could take that will give the garment the least amount of creases.
I’ll actually talk about the green first; this is a representation of the hip box, which itself is a representation/simplification of your whole pelvis area. You see how your legs and hip box oppose angles here. in almost all poses except standing straight, your hip box and legs will create a bent angle, which affects how clothes fall.
The red/blue is the skirt (obvs), the red specifically is the ellipses of the top and bottom openings of the skirt. This skirt is very stiff material for the sake of this example, so notice how the two ellipses always match eachother. the top ellipse is where the skirt is actually attached to the body, so it’s the boss; the bottom ellipse will more or less do exactly what the top one does.
here’s where the fact that the legs and hip box are at different angles becomes important. The top of the skirt is attached to the hip box, but the bottom ellipse is in the realm of the legs. The orange lampshade shape diagram there is a simplification of this. It is very much like if you were to tilt a lampshade. The side you are bending towards will hug the body and create creases. The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line.

It even works with pants, though as the bottom ellipse(s) gets farther away from the top there’s more room for the garment to get distorted by gravity, perspective, and bent knees and such. But with this last example you can really see how the side touching the legs really hugs the body underneath, whereas the other side hangs off of it in a straighter, crease-less line.
Dresses are a little different because their top ellipse is attached to your torso/ribcage mass rather than the hip box.

Much of the time you get the same result as with a skirt. However if the hip box and ribcage mass are opposed sideways rather than forward or backward, it becomes a little tougher:

You can see in the third drawing how a shirt and a skirt together would fall in opposite ways if your body is bent sideways. If the shirt is long, just like I mentioned above about the long pants, there is more distortion of this effect.
I’ll take what I said above, “The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line”, and add a bit to the end: “… until it hits something." In the fourth drawing above, the garment is falling off the body in a straight line on the right side. If you lengthen the garment:

The straight side continues down as normal until it hits the leg and becomes the body-hugging side. in response to that, the body-hugging side from farther up becomes the straight side when it falls off the hip.
Aaand with that I think I’ll stop lol. I hope that wasn’t hard to understand. It’s easy to do yourself, just wear a skirt or some loose pajama pants and take hula poses in the mirror lol.

elliotoille:

felt like doing a tutorial thingy (what should I call these??) again! I think I’ll make a tag for these in case I do more. This time I’m gonna talk a little about how angles affect how clothing falls aaaand stuff. here we go…

Given: The first drawing of these three is how the clothing naturally wants to fall, how it is made to be shaped. Or, whichever pose you could take that will give the garment the least amount of creases.

  • I’ll actually talk about the green first; this is a representation of the hip box, which itself is a representation/simplification of your whole pelvis area. You see how your legs and hip box oppose angles here. in almost all poses except standing straight, your hip box and legs will create a bent angle, which affects how clothes fall.
  • The red/blue is the skirt (obvs), the red specifically is the ellipses of the top and bottom openings of the skirt. This skirt is very stiff material for the sake of this example, so notice how the two ellipses always match eachother. the top ellipse is where the skirt is actually attached to the body, so it’s the boss; the bottom ellipse will more or less do exactly what the top one does.
  • here’s where the fact that the legs and hip box are at different angles becomes important. The top of the skirt is attached to the hip box, but the bottom ellipse is in the realm of the legs. The orange lampshade shape diagram there is a simplification of this. It is very much like if you were to tilt a lampshade. The side you are bending towards will hug the body and create creases. The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line.

imageimage

It even works with pants, though as the bottom ellipse(s) gets farther away from the top there’s more room for the garment to get distorted by gravity, perspective, and bent knees and such. But with this last example you can really see how the side touching the legs really hugs the body underneath, whereas the other side hangs off of it in a straighter, crease-less line.

Dresses are a little different because their top ellipse is attached to your torso/ribcage mass rather than the hip box.

image

Much of the time you get the same result as with a skirt. However if the hip box and ribcage mass are opposed sideways rather than forward or backward, it becomes a little tougher:

image

You can see in the third drawing how a shirt and a skirt together would fall in opposite ways if your body is bent sideways. If the shirt is long, just like I mentioned above about the long pants, there is more distortion of this effect.

I’ll take what I said above, “The side you are bending away from will fall off the body in a straight line”, and add a bit to the end: “… until it hits something." In the fourth drawing above, the garment is falling off the body in a straight line on the right side. If you lengthen the garment:

image

The straight side continues down as normal until it hits the leg and becomes the body-hugging side. in response to that, the body-hugging side from farther up becomes the straight side when it falls off the hip.

Aaand with that I think I’ll stop lol. I hope that wasn’t hard to understand. It’s easy to do yourself, just wear a skirt or some loose pajama pants and take hula poses in the mirror lol.

THOUGHTS ON COMICS CONVENTIONS

jasonlatour:

Last weekend was Baltimore Comic Con, a show that was fairly pleasant by my standards and expectations of a comics convention. All in all it was a laid back, fun experience. A good time with friends and fellow creators and a good opportunity to talk to those of you who stopped by the table.

But towards the end of the show I had a couple of encounters that have got me thinking about what my expectations of a show are and how those have largely changed over the years. Granted I’m in a much better, slightly more privileged place these days, but it wasn’t so long ago that cons were a really torturous experience. I really do still understand what it feels like to attend a con hoping for a leg up, only to find yourself face down.

The conversations I had this weekend were with a few folks in that position. Some successful pros, others maybe not so fortunate yet. They inspired me to write down my thoughts on attending comics cons as a creator, which is something I’m really an old hand at. The philosophies I largely abide by are in a state of constant evolution. Honestly they’re the by product of far more error than trial.  But of late  they’ve really seemed to make attending conventions a much more rewarding experience and and have in no small way  been beneficial to the career I’m trying to build and art I’m trying to create.

So with that in mind here’s what this thing isn’t:


It’s not how to nail a portfolio review or get an editor’s email.

It’s not what magic pen to use in order to ink like Wally Wood.

It’s not how to get rich at a comics show.

 

If that’s the kind of stuff you want advice on there are plenty of better folks to get it from. What I have to say MIGHT lead you to people who do  know how to do all of the above and more. But I can’t promise you that. All I know is what has and hasn’t worked for me, and to some degree why. It should go without saying that ultimately it’s up to you to determine what that’s worth.

Still with me? Okay, don’t say I didn’t warn you…

Read More

Pro-Tip: Re: Conventions.

The problem isn’t coming up with ideas, it is how to contain the invasion.

Werner Herzog (source)

(Source: tozozozo-x)

sprite37:

ricelily:

All these pages are 8.5x11, 300 dpi. Feel free to print it out in full size if you like physical copies

Comics and Comic Artists

Jake Wyatt- deviantart tumblr

"Welcome To Summers"

"Soliloquy"

Suggested Reading/Books:

Scott McCloud’s “Making Comics” (entirely done in comic format)

Exercises/Practices/Tutorials:

Lettering

Speech Bubbles Mistakes

Paint Bucket Resource

Storyboarding and Camera angles

What is DPI?

Transferring Traditional to Digital (Photoshop Tutorial)

Keeping this as a reference for when I get my connection back.

anatomicalart:

Let me link Yall’ to this holy grail.
I present to you Character Design Reference
on [Pintrest] || [Tumblr] || [Twitter] || [Facebook] || [YouTube]

I couldn’t even include all of the reference boards this blog contains on this photoset. That’s right! There’s EVEN MORE! There are pages and pages of them! It is an inspiration treasure trove!
Bookmark this link!
Fill your life with inspiration!