I am currently a student attending a city university member college. I am also taking courses at an Atelier while exploring employment opportunities in writing and editing. No idea why I came here, but I'll hopefully figure that all out soon.

 

jamesab:

jamesab:

[Full Size View of Main Image]
-Paypal is barbyvixon@yahoo.com.Contact is Ai-Ai-Ai-1@hotmail.comContact through Tumblr and Email. But if you send an Email you should also probably send an Ask saying you sent an Email, Cause Otherwise I don’t check my Email very often lmaoPayment is upfront.-Sketch - $10Inked - $20Color - $30Shading - $50Each additional character is an extra $15-Portrait Sketch - $5Portrait Inked - $10Portrait Color - $15Portrait Shaded - $30Each additional character is the same price.
-Will not draw
Real people having sex (Celebrities, you, your friends/wife/neighbor w/e)
Furries
Poop, Piss, Guro , Vore, Kids, Rape,

I need $100 to replace my monitor, it got kinda busted while trying to move it
I’d appreciate it if anyone could help out.

jamesab:

jamesab:

[Full Size View of Main Image]

-
Paypal is barbyvixon@yahoo.com.

Contact is Ai-Ai-Ai-1@hotmail.com

Contact through Tumblr and Email. But if you send an Email you should also probably send an Ask saying you sent an Email, Cause Otherwise I don’t check my Email very often lmao

Payment is upfront.

-
Sketch - $10
Inked - $20
Color - $30
Shading - $50
Each additional character is an extra $15

-

Portrait Sketch - $5
Portrait Inked - $10
Portrait Color - $15
Portrait Shaded - $30

Each additional character is the same price.

-

Will not draw

  • Real people having sex (Celebrities, you, your friends/wife/neighbor w/e)
  • Furries
  • Poop, Piss, Guro , Vore, Kids, Rape,

I need $100 to replace my monitor, it got kinda busted while trying to move it

I’d appreciate it if anyone could help out.

You’re never not going to have critics. And it’s probably always going to bother you.


The harsh truth about being successful is that you are going to make people irrationally mad at you in the process.


It’s inevitable.


Part of the painful journey.


Your peers, your family, your community — they can all seem like enemies at times. Each one tearing you apart as you pass by in your quest for achieving big expectations.


The things that make you successful are sometimes offensive to other people. The choices that you have to make are annoying to other people who don’t always understand your motivations.


And you might be missing out on the fact that life is normal.

It’s normal for people not to like you.

It’s uncomfortable, painful, and endlessly frustrating. But what is supposed to happen.


So what do you do? How do you stay focused and inspired?


1. Be clear in your own head about why what you want to achieve is so important.


2. Accept responsibility for the parts of your zealotry that need to be improved.


3. Build a group of friends and mentors whom you can trust to be fair and honest.


4. Laugh off the silliest accusations and make yourself smile even though you don’t feel like it.


5. Take time each week to review through your goals and ideas and progress.


6. Tune out almost everyone around you most of the time.

It’s not easy to do, or fun.


But that’s the price you pay for doing what most other people only read about in books.

You’re one of the few destined to be remembered by history. Some angry chit-chat along the way is a small price to pay.

So fight on…

-  Dan Waldschmidt (via leseanthomas)

rafchu:

NSFW Boobies everywhere!!! Run for your life!

Some training doodles to master the arcanes of big boobs. Gravity is a hell to draw !! (\( סּ.סּ)/)

whistlefrog:

Most people will know that you can’t force creating your own style.  It usually just happens.  But I’ve been constantly switching styles for my entire art career, and while it’s given me some decent diversity, I was thinking that it was time I settled into a style.  Not for everything, just for me as WhistleFrog.
I think once you reach a certain point, you CAN actually force a style, if for no other reason than you’ve been drawing long enough to know what to do.  As arrogant as it sounds, that’s what I’ve been doing for the past couple weeks (maybe a little longer), and the first picture I actually used it on was this one.
I don’t plan to stick with the cel-shaded look, I’ve just been doing that to finish these pictures off quickly.
This picture was a self-imposed exercise to see what my EL characters would look like in this style.  I’m still working on it, but I was trying to emphasize the differences in their facial structure, eye shape, nose, and mouth.
tl;dr, I’m trying to bring a little bit of consistency into my work.

whistlefrog:

Most people will know that you can’t force creating your own style.  It usually just happens.  But I’ve been constantly switching styles for my entire art career, and while it’s given me some decent diversity, I was thinking that it was time I settled into a style.  Not for everything, just for me as WhistleFrog.

I think once you reach a certain point, you CAN actually force a style, if for no other reason than you’ve been drawing long enough to know what to do.  As arrogant as it sounds, that’s what I’ve been doing for the past couple weeks (maybe a little longer), and the first picture I actually used it on was this one.

I don’t plan to stick with the cel-shaded look, I’ve just been doing that to finish these pictures off quickly.

This picture was a self-imposed exercise to see what my EL characters would look like in this style.  I’m still working on it, but I was trying to emphasize the differences in their facial structure, eye shape, nose, and mouth.

tl;dr, I’m trying to bring a little bit of consistency into my work.

rafchu:

Another artbooks dump, as requested Re:Cutie Honey groundworks and Dead Leaves groundworks.

- Dead Leaves : black and white (few color pages of… black and white key images, weird) 170 pages, almost all the key images of the movie by Imaishi. It’s my only “chinese” artbook as at the time the movie got released (around what, 2004?), it wasn’t popular enough for western anime shops to order some :/

- Re:Cutie Honey : black and white (come solor pages but of illustration linearts, mainly black and white pages) 280 pages. Almost all the key images for the Cutie Honey reboot by Gainax, lots of different artists.

They’re both worth the price you’ll pay (they’re quite rare now as they’re old and I don’t think they got reprinted) but if you go to Japan, I saw some of them for cheap in Mandarake shops (as usual with Mandarake shops, you’ll have better choice and prices outside Tokyo).
Maybe there are still some of this Dead Leaves chinese counterfeit artbooks online (doesn’t matter if the quality is cheap as it’s only black and white images ^^)

Editing Watercolor Scans

vanessamakesthings:

Hi again, guys! Sorry again to spam your dashs, but here’s how I edit my watercolor scans. My scanner, like most scanners I’m sure, doesn’t have very good color accuracy, plus I tried out some new brown Higgins ink on this and it bled REALLY bad, so I have lots of edits to show you, lol!

This is what we’re going for with the final colors:

A photo of the painting itself.  I actually use watered down gouache for a lot of my paintings, so this one ended up “thicker” than usual watercolor. (see that smeared Higgins ink!?!?! grrrr)

The photo looks a thousand times better than the raw scan:

Here’s the problem with scanning watercolors: your scanner is probably off in color (mine’s too yellow usually), it flattens out all your cool values that you spent forever on, and the background texture of the white is annoying. If your painting doesn’t have large empty white spaces, editing is easier, but I like spot illustrations that don’t have white-paper backgrounds, so…onto to editing.

Erase the background and adjust the levels to get rid of the paper texture like yesterday (again, it’s okay if there are some fuzzballs the levels didn’t catch):

Now to deal with color correction. This is a bit of a process, and an art, and it takes lots of personal tweaking to find what you like. Because this ended up too yellow, I dropped a layer of red in, set to screen, and then because I wanted to darken her hair, I added another layer on top and painted a dark brown with the flow (under “other properties” in the brush palette) set to pen pressure, and then I set the whole layer to overlay and dropped the opacity.  I used a layer mask on this layer so I could paint roughly and clean up later. (Layer masks are the rectangle with the circle in it at the bottom of the layer palette; click that while selecting the layer you want and then you can erase parts you don’t want of that layer using a black paint brush; using white is like “erasing” the mask).  I also tend to use the hue/saturation tool (image > adjustments > hue/saturation) to tweak either the layers I lay on top to get the right color or the entire painting itself (for pieces that require less editing, that’s sometimes all I do).

Then I fix the fuzzballs and ink smears (thank you Higgins) using a white paint brush and the rubber stamp tool like yesterday:

And after looking at the color rough and seeing that I liked her face better in it, I used the rubber stamp tool to change her face shape a bit.  I also added some black to her eyelashes because they had been lightened more than I wanted by the screen layer of red.

Done!

Not all of my watercolors require this much editing, but I learned my lesson with Higgins ink — it does not like thick gouache under it! :P I guess it worked as a demo though because I had a lot to change. Adjusting the colors with overlay layers, hue/saturation, or the color balance tool (image > adjustments > color balance) just takes experimentation and practice, but this is why I label half of my pieces “mixed media,” haha! Anyway, I hope this was helpful to some of you and thanks again for reading! :)

Cleaning Up Scans Tutorial

vanessamakesthings:

Hey guys! Yesterday artofcrystaldawn asked me how I digitally clean up my scans so I thought I’d make a little tutorial for all of you! Today I’ll show you the steps I take to clean up my sketches and this afternoon I’m going to paint this drawing and then I’ll show you how I digitally tweak the scans of my watercolors. Digital is about 50% of the process for me, both in the beginning (color roughs) and the end (tweaking bad scans to make them look either like the original or better than the original!).

I’m by no means a photoshop-ninja, these are just things I’ve picked up over time, but I wish someone had told me how to clean scans years ago so I thought I’d post my process. Sorry if this post takes up a lot of space on your dashboards (lots of photos!). If you don’t want to read it all, here’s a short breakdown of tips:

1. use a rough-edged brush to paint white

2. treat the rubber stamp tool like a brush and alter it’s settings, you’ll get more natural results

3. err on the side of not overdoing things. over-adjusting levels or over-doing the rubber stamp will look either garish or blurry (the more you rubber stamp, the blurrier it gets).  Dab at it instead.

This entire process takes about 10 minutes once you’re used to it, so it’s pretty fast!

STEP ONE: PAINT AWAY STUFF YOU DON’T WANT

Here’s the original scan of this drawing, pretty crappy:

I use a rough-edged brush to paint white around the part I want. I choose a rough brush because I think it helps to have a non-hard edge between where you’ve erased and where you haven’t to help it look more natural.

STEP TWO: ADJUST LEVELS (LIGHTLY!)

With less information to mess with, and most of the big stuff taken care of, I adjust the levels. Don’t go nuts doing this, though I totally find it tempting, too! I try to stay just right of the big peak of white because if I put the marker in the middle of the white it ends up looking too washed out (especially if I have “grey” tones like shaded-in skin tones). I mostly just adjust the white and then carefully tweak the middle values and barely touch the darkest values for sketches, or else the whole thing starts to look too garish. It’s okay if there are a few fuzzballs that adjusting the levels didn’t fix, we’ll get to those.

STEP THREE: FIX FUZZBALLS BY PAINTING

See these fuzzballs? 

BEFORE

This is when I go through and paint with the paintbrush in white the little imperfections away. I also sometimes edit the drawing a little here like removing those crazy sketch lines at the bottom of the drawing.

AFTER (I didn’t get them all this time, oh well)

STEP FOUR: RUBBER STAMP AWAY YOUR MESS UPS!

Sometimes I bung things up in a way I can’t erase with painting, so I use the rubber stamp tool. This thing is a powerful tool, so I recommend treating it with respect and not going nuts with it. :) I used to overuse it and it makes pieces look blurry or fuzzy. I dab with it now (with a tablet pen) and I also recommend playing with the opacity/flow in the “other dynamics” settings on the brush. It took me years to realize you could edit the tip of the rubber stamp, durr, but I seriously recommend it! It makes the stamp look much more natural (a must for watercolor editing which will come tomorrow).

Here are the things we’re trying to remove:

BEFORE

Settings I use. The brush is under “wet media brushes” in the basic brushes that come with photoshop cs4 (I’m behind, what).  The other dynamics are set to off with this picture because what I was removing wasn’t complicated, but I think it’s worth playing with them to see what you like:

AFTER:

And there you have it! It’s not perfect, but then again, it IS a sketch! :) I hope that helps, guys, and thanks once again for all your support! Stay-tuned, tomorrow I’ll post a tutorial on how to edit watercolor scans!