I am currently a student attending a city university member college. I am also taking courses at an Atelier while exploring employment opportunities in writing and editing. No idea why I came here, but I'll hopefully figure that all out soon.

 

atokniiro:

Success, a short comic about following your dreams

(made in celebration of my Facebook page reaching 100K Likes)

clawofthefallen:

gamesanddoodles:

sourcescited:

HUGE cache of drawing and art related book PDF files.

There’s literally hundreds of great drawing, manga, comic, painting, sculpting, and art related books on this site. The website language is in Russian but many of the books are in their native language. Hopefully this is as helpful to many others as it was to me! 

Okay but seriously though.

It doesn’t stop doubtful manga looking artbooks.
There are anatomy artbooks by Vilppu, by Matessi…Artbooks from video games( ac , thieves …) ,  Artbooks about zbrush modelling, 3DS max lightning how to texture properly. Even how to concept art for video Games !!Without mentioning artbooks from movies ! From Miyazaki to Pacific Rim, I encourage you to check them out. This post doesn’t have nearly enough notes ! Fellow artits, share the references around ! =D

It is my duty as an artist to pass these on! ò3ó>

zhevickmeister asked
Hey Lesean! I've got a question about storyboards for portfolios. I've had various teachers at school tell me different things but what would you consider the standard of cleanliness for presenting boards? I've seen some of your drawings with construction lines still in them and others sooo clean, they can be used for key animation. What keeps me torn are some of Disney's recent boards for Tangled&Frozen. They're really sketchy.

leseanthomas:

Hey zhevickmeister!

Thanks for reaching out and that’s great question. Truth be told, there is no one right or wrong way to do storyboards. It all really depends on the production, the needs and standards of any said production. On one hand you have outsourced TV show productions which conventionally dictate that boards have to be extremely tight and on model. Why? Because they don’t handle layout or usually know who the layout artist is (Sad, I know) so it’s needed usually in order to hopefully ensure the most control over picture once it leaves pre production abroad.

Different directors have different skills and access to different resources; for shows that encompass all production in house (pre/main/post) emphasis on boards aren’t really necessary, so long as the jokes, intent and narrative is translated clearly. They rely on layout to REALLy get to the bones of animation (staging, lighting, composition and models—model check cleans up the mess). 

Some directors who storyboard cannot help themselves as they are extremely talented draftsmen/women who can visualize their sequences in great detail even though they have an amazing layout/animation team to support them. Take Satoshi Kon (RIP) for example. here are some of his TOKYO GODFATHERS Boards: image

And then, there’s Mamoro Oshii, acclaimed director of the classic GHOST IN THE SHELL: 
image

As you can see these would be considered ” primitive” storyboards, however, not everyone has the production vision and accomplished writer/filmmaker experience that Oshii does, or blessed with  Layout artist & animation phenom Kazuchika Kise at the helm of their animated project.

Some boards have even less information, but with the help of a strong main production team, it’s not necessary so long as it’s clear enough, image-wise. Here are some even messier storyboards from Gainax’s Evangelion:

image

Details regarding storyboards and their complexity vary from project to project & dependent on how much control any said director has on their overall final picture of their film or episode. This isn’t including storyboard artists who are also animators and layout artists (rare in American TV Animation production), as that can also have an impact (seeing as they do the subsequential stages of animation production, their storyboards benefit largely from knowing whats needed and whats not needed because they are experienced/knowledgeable about the following stages as well and who will be doing them).

As for me, I was raised on a healthy diet of Katsuhiro Otomo, Satoshi Kon, Yasoumi Umetsu & Hayao Miyazaki story boards and have hoarded their works in my personal collection. Their level of detail is something I’ve learned from as a growing, aspiring comic book illustrator. Since I have had less experience in my career seeing the entire production of projects I direct to finish at every stage, I’ve had to adhere to the conventional standards of TV animation pre production, which is " the more detailed, hopefully the less you have to worry about them getting it wrong overseas."

This “pink elephant” or “blind production” process in standard, subcontracted TV animation production was never something I approved of, but it is such the case in mod TV animation productions in the states (Not so much for me in the last 5 years). Much less so for CGI/2D features and smaller projects as their layout crew are usually in house with them to communicate wth.


As for you, the main concern should be your ability to emote expressions clearly, have a solid grasp of storytelling ability and communicating your ideas clearly. That’s mostly what productions look for regardless of whats compartmentalized production-wise. How detailed your boards should be will be something that matters once you’re hired and plugged into said studios pipeline process.


Good luck! :-)

unlucky-day asked
I'm particularly intrigued by how you choose to include water in your drawings and how you portray it, often the subject in your artwork is gracefully floating in a thousand different shades of colours... Is it a coincidence or your trademark?

nesskain:

Well it’s a story I’ve been thinking for 4 5 years. I’ll draw it when my others will be done and it takes hell of time…

But for those “doodle” I don’t want to get too much crazy with backgrounds in order to focus on colors.

With water I can  be more abstract as I have a very “logic” mind… it helps me to get through this problem…

I try to limit myself, so I pick up only one subject, it is so easy to get lost… I don’t know how people can be concept artist and work for others, I have so many technic issue, there are so many things to know and handle… I mean, there are so many crazy art out there, I’m still trying figuring out how it’s possible.

So yeah, sometimes people think I’m good, but I’m not. I’m just doing what I really want to master…. But some guys contact me to do conceptart, illustrations, video games or whatever that doesn’t interest me…

It is just impossible to me… I don’t know… If you check my portfolio it is really not made for all those jobs.

(just let me draw my bearded man and my flat nose girl and leave me alone :D).cheers,

Nesskain.

leseanthomas:

Early Samurai Champloo concept sketches of Mugen, Jin, FUU and random characters buy the incomparable KAZUTO NAKAZAWA ( Character Designer/animation supervisor). Joy. 

micrypt asked
How did you learn to draw & paint cute illustrations? I've scoured the bookshelves, and haven't had much luck.

gg-art:

I threw a lot of money at art school.

But you could try scouring the internet’s bookshelves, for artwork I’ve found the internet’s resources to be much more vast and helpful than a library’s. There are probably tens of thousands of art tutorials on deviantart alone. If you’re willing to spend money you can even take online classes taught by working artists, buy instructional video tutorials, or approach an artist for private tutoring.

Anonymous asked
So many artists are saying to screw art school and study art solo. Debt is usually the reason not to go because that much money (the average debt) is not worth an art school education. What do you think? What have been yours/your peers' post-college experiences? It seems that art school helped you in numerous little ways... Are you paying loans right now while building your portfolio?

gg-art:

I feel like I’ve answered a question similar to this before but I can’t find it so if this is a rehash to anyone sorry.

The wishy washy: I loved art school. The sheer variety of perspectives on how to approach art I got, the engagement of my teachers with my art, the discussions and critiques from so many different perspectives, and of course the general experience of leaving home and bla dee bla, that stuff is pretty irreplacable to me. If I hadn’t gone, not only would I not look at art the same way I do now, I also wouldn’t be the same person I am now. Okay, wishy washy is over.

Much as I’m grateful for having attended art school, I’m all for going solo and studying your own way. I do believe that to get good instruction you’re going to have to shell out some cash - in the form of books at the least (and really that’s the LEAST) or online classes, or tutoring. The best teachers aren’t giving away their knowledge for free. But it’s a lot less money than The Institution. Would I do it over having gone to art school? Probably not. But all of my experiences come from a place being particularly privileged to have a full college fund by the time I graduated high school, which is not a reality for most people. So I really think the personal financial risk is just too variable by each individual’s circumstances for anyone to really make a decision based on someone else’s experience. Especially mine, since it’s atypical.

My only word of concrete advice in this overly long answer is that if you (general you) are seriously considering art school and you’re unsure about its worth regarding your money dollars, all considerations should always be about the education’s quality and how it will grow you as a person and an artist, not about the job security and what’s going to happen to you after college. If you’re saying “that’s fucking crazy, I’m going to go into debt I want to be able to pay it off before I fucking DIE” (yes, very true) then 100% go your own way and skip art school, get your education in cheaper ways because you absolutely cannot leverage your art school degree against your debt.* Don’t make the mistake of looking at it that way. It’s not a medical degree. Shit, the degree is so meaningless that when I accidentally spilled shampoo all over mine (it was in a suitcase) I did not give two flying fucks. And if you make that mistake, like I did, and everything doesn’t go hunky-dory after you leave art school, you will pay for it in overwhelming guilt and self-loathing. Don’t do that. It’s dumb, it’s a lot of pain and anxiety that does not make you a better person or get you a job. If you go to art school, embrace it for the experience and the personal growth you can get out of it.

*A lot of the time if you are applying for a salaried art position at a company it will ask for a degree in at least a relevant field and if you didn’t graduate from art school that will definitely suck. Maybe they actually do mean it and not having that degree will cost you that job, but maybe they also don’t care as long as your portfolio is great. Just apply anyway.

Anonymous asked
So how did you get your art skills and are you taking any classes in it or just doing your own thing?

rocketraptor:

It all comes down to practice haha. Also you never “get” your skills, you work for it. Some people have the illusion that talent is a magical thing that just appears when you’re born. It’s nothing more then pursued interest.

Back in the day I was in a little drawing club with friends, we would come together every friday to sit and draw for 3 hours. It was never really serious, but it did help me a great deal to get started. Sadly our teacher fell critically ill and the club was closed down shortly after…I was 13 at the time.

I also went to art school for a bit, but apart from life drawing I didn’t feel it \ helped me a lot. And I eventually didn’t see a future with the study I was doing.

So yeah I guess you could say that most of the things I learned came from my own incentive, just doing studies here and there, and just continuous drawing.

anatomicalart:

My art teacher told me a really motivational thing. She said, “you’re not making improvement unless you’re making bad art.”What she meant was, if you’re drawing something that you find easy to draw you’re not really learning. If you’re trying to draw what you find hard to draw, then you’re learning and improving.if you’re struggling. If you’re really trying but what you’re doing just doesn’t look correct to you, but you just keep working at trying to get it right, well that’s where you’re really improving.
Venturing outside your comfort zone is the key to artistic improvement. It’s also one of the scariest things to do, so it’s okay to be afraid but you should really give it a go.

anatomicalart:

My art teacher told me a really motivational thing.
She said, “you’re not making improvement unless you’re making bad art.”
What she meant was, if you’re drawing something that you find easy to draw you’re not really learning. If you’re trying to draw what you find hard to draw, then you’re learning and improving.
if you’re struggling. If you’re really trying but what you’re doing just doesn’t look correct to you, but you just keep working at trying to get it right, well that’s where you’re really improving.

Venturing outside your comfort zone is the key to artistic improvement. It’s also one of the scariest things to do, so it’s okay to be afraid but you should really give it a go.

(Source: pleasestopbeingsad)