I am currently a student attending a city university member college. I am also taking courses at an Atelier while exploring employment opportunities in writing and editing. No idea why I came here, but I'll hopefully figure that all out soon.

 

leseanthomas:

giancarlovolpe:

A little behind the scenes look of the early stages of Green Lantern the Animated Series.

My eternal gratitude to everyone who helped prove the doubters wrong.

Although I don’t produce children’s content, this is real and relevant. Also an explanation to a lot of those on the other side who don’t understand the challenges creatives face when doing stuff they think you will love.

leseanthomas:

Original “Alternate Dandy crews” concept designs from Season 2 Space Dandy Premiere. Loving the different styles (from 80s-current) in each approach in one show. :-)

visualengineer:

The Art of Studying
I get asked a lot how I got so good in such a short amount of time. Well it’s relative. I spent tons of long hours (Still do) practicing and finding ways to improve! So the follow up question is, what did I do, SPECIFICALLY, to improve. 
I call it A.S.A.P. (everyone loves acronyms)
Assess
Study
Apply
Practice
Let me explain.
-I usually ASSESS the problem at hand. Something like “I need to work on my anatomy, but more specifically the arms.” Once I have done so, I do one painting/sketch to evaluate how bad I am, and try to pinpoint details that generally stand out to me. Gesture, edges, values, structure. I pick one, and begin the next step.
-STUDY my ass off. Not literally, but you know what I mean. And when I mean study I mean, “a detailed investigation and analysis of a subject or situation.” as found in it’s definition. It just doesn’t mean copy paste, it means to STUDY. I gather books, videos, tutorials, images, blogs, whatever I can get my hands on and begin to learn. I spend countless hours of analysis until I feel ready to start the next step. 
-Which is APPLY what I have learned without reference or any real guide. This is a great way to see what information I retained and what I left by the wayside. And what’s great is I still have my notes and studies as a guide to remind me and keep me informed on my findings. As I APPLY my learning to my new painting(s) and feel like there may be some progress I jump to the final step.
-PRACTICE until I get sick of it. You see sometimes things will slip your mind if you only do it a few times. Repetition and PRACTICE helps me cement my findings to more practical use later. Letting my study actually become something of use which helps propel me forward. 
But let’s say you don’t see much improvement. The next thing you need to do is just rinse and repeat everything I said. I assure you if you devote tons of times to this method you will see improvement. Do not just copy and paste what you see. It will help for sure, but you will benefit so much more if you approach it like a scientist looking for the truth. 
Good Luck,AJ

visualengineer:

The Art of Studying

I get asked a lot how I got so good in such a short amount of time. Well it’s relative. I spent tons of long hours (Still do) practicing and finding ways to improve! So the follow up question is, what did I do, SPECIFICALLY, to improve. 

I call it A.S.A.P. (everyone loves acronyms)

Assess

Study

Apply

Practice

Let me explain.

-I usually ASSESS the problem at hand. Something like “I need to work on my anatomy, but more specifically the arms.” Once I have done so, I do one painting/sketch to evaluate how bad I am, and try to pinpoint details that generally stand out to me. Gesture, edges, values, structure. I pick one, and begin the next step.

-STUDY my ass off. Not literally, but you know what I mean. And when I mean study I mean, “a detailed investigation and analysis of a subject or situation.” as found in it’s definition. It just doesn’t mean copy paste, it means to STUDY. I gather books, videos, tutorials, images, blogs, whatever I can get my hands on and begin to learn. I spend countless hours of analysis until I feel ready to start the next step. 

-Which is APPLY what I have learned without reference or any real guide. This is a great way to see what information I retained and what I left by the wayside. And what’s great is I still have my notes and studies as a guide to remind me and keep me informed on my findings. As I APPLY my learning to my new painting(s) and feel like there may be some progress I jump to the final step.

-PRACTICE until I get sick of it. You see sometimes things will slip your mind if you only do it a few times. Repetition and PRACTICE helps me cement my findings to more practical use later. Letting my study actually become something of use which helps propel me forward. 

But let’s say you don’t see much improvement. The next thing you need to do is just rinse and repeat everything I said. I assure you if you devote tons of times to this method you will see improvement. Do not just copy and paste what you see. It will help for sure, but you will benefit so much more if you approach it like a scientist looking for the truth. 

Good Luck,
AJ

le-mec:

A modest collection of mindf***s to help you overcome the MuggleVision(TM) that is impeding your ability to see and draw in perspective.

andava:

Payment: PayPal Payment is required to confirm a commission spot. Once your commission is approved I will let you know and then you can send payment. All payment is upfront on the part of the commissioner.
FOR CONTENT NSFW: If you wanted me to draw an erotic picture I would prefer it to be straight. But what about if it wasn’t? Say you wanted to commission me to do a shemale/Futa piece, I would be very hesitant to comply but I would because I want to be somewhat a “professional.” However, I wouldn’t have much incentive to do it unless I was compensated enough to do it.) Get me? So on explicit content my rates vary and I would have to make arrangements and agreements on the price…Maybe If I’m in a good mood I don’t care and will accept it.
-For returning customers they have discounts. I will not disclose how much the discount is but it is pretty hefty.
-(This is a must!!) Reference of the character is required, I will not draw a character based on a written description. A bunch of photos of people and clothes saying “this is what I think they’d look like” to supplement your written description does not help either :/
-Characters which I design belong to me. (Reason is to keep or put it in my Portfolio.)
-You are allowed to post the piece to your gallery (or galleries) as long as credit and a link-back is given. -You are allowed to print it out to hang, or make things for your own personal use.-YOU CANNOT sell the artwork for profit or reproduce the image in any way.
-Posting Rights: I have the right to post all commissions in my galleries and/or website and use them as advertising for my services.
email and paypal address
andres.avalos1992@gmail.com

andava:

Payment: PayPal
Payment is required to confirm a commission spot. Once your commission is approved I will let you know and then you can send payment. All payment is upfront on the part of the commissioner.

FOR CONTENT NSFW: If you wanted me to draw an erotic picture I would prefer it to be straight. But what about if it wasn’t? Say you wanted to commission me to do a shemale/Futa piece, I would be very hesitant to comply but I would because I want to be somewhat a “professional.” However, I wouldn’t have much incentive to do it unless I was compensated enough to do it.) Get me? So on explicit content my rates vary and I would have to make arrangements and agreements on the price…Maybe If I’m in a good mood I don’t care and will accept it.

-For returning customers they have discounts. I will not disclose how much the discount is but it is pretty hefty.

-(This is a must!!) Reference of the character is required, I will not draw a character based on a written description. A bunch of photos of people and clothes saying “this is what I think they’d look like” to supplement your written description does not help either :/

-Characters which I design belong to me. (Reason is to keep or put it in my Portfolio.)

-You are allowed to post the piece to your gallery (or galleries) as long as credit and a link-back is given.
-You are allowed to print it out to hang, or make things for your own personal use.
-YOU CANNOT sell the artwork for profit or reproduce the image in any way.

-Posting Rights:
I have the right to post all commissions in my galleries and/or website and use them as advertising for my services.

email and paypal address

andres.avalos1992@gmail.com

olgaulanova:

thewritewire:

Show vs. Tell 
Great description of the difference.

This is one of the biggest problems I’ve encountered in animation scripts. There’s been a few times a script would say something like “And then all hell breaks loose! Our heroes fight their way out.”
Literally.
But to show what that looks like, to make up the action, to make sure everything in the scene tracks and makes sense, and maybe is exciting to watch? That is the real work of action storyboarding. In a multi-page handout, those two lines could easily equal the bulk of the work.
Plus, this sort of “telling not showing” makes it really hard to estimate the amount of time it’ll take to board the scene! Evocative language like “all hell breaks loose” doesn’t give a clear indication of the scale of conflict. Did the writer mean a quick but intense skirmish? Or did they mean an outright battle? That’s what I’ll be figuring out at 2 in the morning on a Saturday night. :/ 
So dear (aspiring) writers, please don’t turn in lazy scripts. Please show, don’t tell.

olgaulanova:

thewritewire:

Show vs. Tell 

Great description of the difference.

This is one of the biggest problems I’ve encountered in animation scripts. There’s been a few times a script would say something like “And then all hell breaks loose! Our heroes fight their way out.”

Literally.

But to show what that looks like, to make up the action, to make sure everything in the scene tracks and makes sense, and maybe is exciting to watch? That is the real work of action storyboarding. In a multi-page handout, those two lines could easily equal the bulk of the work.

Plus, this sort of “telling not showing” makes it really hard to estimate the amount of time it’ll take to board the scene! Evocative language like “all hell breaks loose” doesn’t give a clear indication of the scale of conflict. Did the writer mean a quick but intense skirmish? Or did they mean an outright battle? That’s what I’ll be figuring out at 2 in the morning on a Saturday night. :/

So dear (aspiring) writers, please don’t turn in lazy scripts. Please show, don’t tell.

Advice on Art

artful-purgatory:

Someone contacted me for advice on getting into the industry of freelancing and gaming.  Since it’s a wall of text, but useful text, I decided to share it here for anyone else that might be interested in that advice!

I hear you about the drama regarding art, it’s not too different in “the industry”, sadly.  There are the bigger-named celebs like Feng Zhu, Kekai Kotaki, etc.  These guys generally get the run of the show in the industry, they get the bigger jobs, the better jobs, the glamour jobs.  The rest of us kind of pick up the scraps of what was turned down, and as terrible as it sounds, it’s not all bad.
To answer your questions, there was no real point in which I “decided” I was no longer an amateur.  I always feel like an amateur, and that is no joke.  It will always feel like you’re riding the coat tails of the bigger artists that will inevitably be “better than you”.  But, if I had to think of a point in time in which I could finally call myself a “professional” it was my first gig doing contract work for a local gaming company in the Bay Area.  When companies are starting to finally see you and approach you for work on their own accord, you can safely bet that you’ve emerged from that precarious “amateur” stage.  Still, I’d stress the point that as artists we are always learning, and always evolving our techniques.  If you’ve met an artist that told you they’re just “done learning” they’re full of it :)
Anyway, looking through your gallery the biggest thing I can see is the sheer variety of styles you have going on.  You know the saying “Jack of all trades, master of none”?  That is what most people will see if they are reviewing your portfolio and see just a little TOO many varieties in style.  My advice to you right now would be the boil down your portfolio into pieces you’d LIKE people to see your work as; if you’re into painting and creature design, show off more of that.  If you like doing cartoons and sprites for 2D mobile games, fill your portfolio with that.  This way, if someone working on a mobile 2D game needs sprites, they’ll come across your work and see that you must clearly “know what you’re doing” (I mean, from their perspective, it’s basically all you do, right? ;) ).  So, find pieces that speak to you as an artist, commercial or non-commercial, and let the people seeing your portfolio “know” you as an artist.  That way, if they have a project for you, they know who to call for it.  You won’t get *every* job.  In fact, you may get bites and realize that they aren’t willing to pay you nearly as much as you deserve, and you’ll have to turn them down.  It’s all a part of the gig.  My advice on payments would be to never lower your amount.  Aim high.  If they can’t meet the cost they aren’t worth your time.
A typical day for me?  Busy!  :)  I work about 10-12 hours a day, even weekends.  The teaching gigs are things I get between work orders, sometimes I’ll make a tutorial myself, but a lot of the time they are commissioned classes, as well.  Most of what I do is commission-based.  I work with a handful of clients fairly regularly, and that is the best bet you can have.  Getting clients that will always have a demand for you, but making sure you have some spare time to expand your portfolio and practice (since most of the time, the work you do on-commission can’t be shown to the public because of NDA agreements, or by the time they’re able to be shown off, they’re a year old and no longer up-to-date with your skill level).  I have a whole couple of folders of “stuff” that hasn’t seen the light of day by anyone but the people who’ve commissioned them, and that’s just kind of how things go.  In the span of 6 months my work will have shifted and changed into something more relevant, and the backlog of stuff bites the dust.  I USED to work in-house at a gaming studio, but the work hours were about the same and I was working for people who didn’t utilize me effectively and it was causing me a lot of stress.  The gaming industry is great to have guaranteed income, but it can be hazardous to your health regarding long work hours, unpaid overtime, no holiday breaks, and the dreaded “crunch modes” where you’d be lucky to see your SO other than to say “goodnight” and pass out once you get home!  It can be tough, but some people thrive in those environments and more power to them.  The only way to know for sure if it’s something you’d love to do for the rest of your life is to give it the old college try and see how it works out for you.  Though, a word of advice would be that if you land a studio job, don’t think of it as a permanent home.  Studios open and close every day, and you may not see it coming.  Always keep a list of clients outside of the office for freelancing opportunities, if you can.  They will really come in handy as a security blanket should something happen and you receive a pink slip. 
I could go on for days, but that’s about the gist of it.  I hope I’ve helped shed some light for you!  As far as marketing yourself, the best I can say is; set up a facebook page for your art, set up lots and lots of galleries from different KINDS of communities, because you never know who is browsing.  DA, Facebook, Art Station, Drawcrowd, Behance, just throw all of your portfolio pieces all around the net, and set up a LinkedIn account to get yourself situated and hopefully looked at by some potential clients.  Hope this helps! 

le-mec:

In TVP Animation Pro, I use a tool called Freehand Line to do my fills. By clicking from point-to-point, I can define angular regions to be filled.

You can do something similar in Photoshop by holding down the ALT key with the lasso tool or using the Polygon Lasso tool, then using SHIFT+F5 to fill the selected region. Don’t forget to turn on anti-aliasing.

xdraws:

xdraws:

For any questions please contact me via xdraws @ live.com!  For more information on on my policies click here.  Prices are negotiable for simpler / more complex projects. Payments are taken via paypal. Thank you!

At the time of posting, 5 slots are open, for up-to-date info go here

I’ve lowered the base prices substantially, this is as low as I can go unfortunately.  Any bump in the right direction would be great.